Monday, 24 October 2011, 1:00PM
Museum of London

Slavery, Ships and Sickness

Professor Stuart Anderson

The full-rigged ship was the essential technology that enabled the trans-Atlantic slave trade to flourish. Between 1698 and 1807 around 11,000 ships were fitted out in England for the slave trade, transporting around three million Africans. But the trade also employed other vessels, from in-shore boats supplying the slavers, to the Navy vessels that protected them. Sickness and disease were constant companions to both slaves and crew. Mortality amongst both was high, from disease, mistreatment, accident and suicide. Dr Stuart Anderson explores the relationship between ships, slavery and sickness, and considers the measures eventually taken to improve health at sea.   This is part of the Great Days of Sail Mondays at One series. The other lectures in this series are as follows:       The Greenlanders - Arctic whaleships and whalers       ‘They live by Trade’: Britain’s global trade in the Great Days of Sail       Why Conserve the Cutty Sark?

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The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

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24 October 2011

Slavery, Ships and Sickness
Professor Stuart Anderson

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