Device is incompatible to play the video
Wednesday, 7 November 2012, 6:00PM
Museum of London

Why the Enlightenment still matters today

Professor Justin Champion

“The Enlightenment” has been regarded as a turning point in the intellectual history of the West. The principles of religious tolerance, optimism about human progress and a demand for rational debate are often thought to be a powerful legacy of the ideas of Locke, Newton, Voltaire and Diderot. There was however a radical Enlightenment, indebted to the materialism of Hobbes and Spinoza, which posed an even greater challenge to traditional religious and political values. Given the ‘return of religion’ and the challenges of potential environmental catastrophe, Professor Champion argues to the contrary in this lecture on why we would be wise to go back to explore some of the more radical insights of Enlightenment freethinkers.

This is the 2012 Joint Royal Historical Society/Gresham College Annual Lecture. The other joint lectures can be accessed here:
       2011 - The Rural Past and Urban Histories, 1881 - 2011 by Professor Alun Howkins
       2010 - What did eighteenth-century men want? by Professor Amanda Vickery
       2009 - The Institutionalisation of the Arts in Early Victorian England
                 by Charles Saumarez Smith
       2008 - History, Science and Religion by Dr Allan Chapman
       2007 - The fabrication of medieval history by Dr Simon Thurley
       2006 - The Curse of the Poke Bonnet: Television's Version by Joan Bakewell
       2005 - Travels in Time: History and identity in today's world by Michael Wood
       2004 - Presenting unwanted histories by Dr Gareth Griffith

speaker_3justinchampion.jpg.crop_display.jpg

Royal Holloway, University of London

Read More
Read Less

Transcript

7 November 2012

Why the Enlightenment still matters today
Professor Justin Champion

View PDF
Print
Related Future Lectures
Related Past Lectures
WATCHED
Part of a series

The Theatre of Dionysus

Professor Edith Hall
Thursday, 29 November 2018 - 1:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Understanding Violent People

Professor Joanna Bourke
Thursday, 6 December 2018 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Sir Thomas Gresham, London, and Europe

Dr Ian Archer
Wednesday, 9 January 2019 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Sacred Listening: The Voices and Music of the Gods

Professor Tom Service
Monday, 14 January 2019 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

How to be a Shakespearean Atheist

Professor Alec Ryrie
Thursday, 24 January 2019 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Evolution since Sir Thomas Gresham: How Changes Over The Past Five Centuries Have Moulded Evolution

Professor Steve Jones
Tuesday, 29 January 2019 - 6:00PM
WATCHED

Has the Internet Changed News for Better or Worse? 250 Years of Technology

Professor Steve Schifferes
Thursday, 15 November 2018 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Enormous Volcanic Eruptions

Professor Sir Stephen Sparks
Wednesday, 14 November 2018 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

The Ending of World War I: The Road to 11 November

Professor David Stevenson
Wednesday, 7 November 2018 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

How the Reformation Trained Us to Be Sceptics

Professor Alec Ryrie
Thursday, 1 November 2018 - 6:00PM
WATCHED

Bribery and Corruption in the City

Nicholas Cooke QC
Tuesday, 30 October 2018 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Strategy and Democracy

Professor Sir Hew Strachan FBA FRSE
Monday, 29 October 2018 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

How Natural is Natural? Historical Perspective on Wildlife and the Environment in England

Professor Tom Williamson
Wednesday, 17 October 2018 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Ten Cities that Built an Empire: Understanding British Imperialism Through the Urban Past

Tristram Hunt MP
Wednesday, 5 October 2016 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Free Speech and the Study of History

Timothy Garton Ash
Wednesday, 28 October 2015 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Making History Online

Professor Tim Hitchcock
Wednesday, 12 November 2014 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

The Private Diary and Public History

Dr Joe Moran
Tuesday, 29 October 2013 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

A Lark Arising: The Rural Past and Urban Histories, 1881 - 2011

Professor Alun Howkins
Wednesday, 16 November 2011 - 6:00PM
WATCHED

Why Do You Use The Word Victim Rather Than Survivor?

Professor Joanna Bourke
Wednesday, 22 November 2017 - 6:58PM
WATCHED

From 1911-31, To What Extent Do You Think There Was A One-Way Conversation Between Western and Chinese Art and Why?

Professor Craig Clunas
Monday, 20 November 2017 - 1:58PM
WATCHED

An architect points out a possible contradiction...

Professor Simon Thurley CBE
Wednesday, 1 February 2017 - 6:59PM
WATCHED

Most Buildings We Revere Are Designed By Craftsman And Not Architects

Professor Simon Thurley CBE
Wednesday, 1 February 2017 - 6:55PM
WATCHED

Why Is Sir Walter Scott Not In Popular Culture Today?

Dr Juliet Shields
Tuesday, 17 January 2017 - 1:59PM
WATCHED

The English Image of Scotland Prior to Sir Walter Scott's Writing

Dr Juliet Shields
Tuesday, 17 January 2017 - 1:58PM