Device is incompatible to play the video
Tuesday, 8 October 2019, 6:00PM - 7:00PM
Museum of London

1667 and The Royal Society: A Manifesto for the Future

Dr Patricia Fara

When Thomas Sprat’s The History of the Royal-Society of London appeared in 1667, it was less a history than a manifesto for the future, designed to convince Charles II that experimental research was a worthwhile investment. 

Focusing on experiment and travel, this lecture describes the aims and activities of the early Royal Society almost two centuries before the word ‘scientist’ was invented. As Sprat made clear, science, imperialism and finance were inextricably linked.

speaker_patriciafara-370x370.jpg

Patricia has a degree in physics from Oxford and a PhD in History of Science from London. Based at Cambridge University since 1993, she is an Emeritus Fellow of Clare College and was President of the British Society for the History of Science from 2016-18. 

Her major research topics are eighteenth-century England and scientific portraits, but she has published a range of academic and popular books on the history of science. Her most recent is A Lab of One's Own: Science and Suffrage in the First World War (2018) but others include the prize winning Science: A Four Thousand Year History (2009), Newton: The Making of a Genius (2002) and Pandora's Breeches: Women, Science and Power in the Enlightenment (2004).

In addition to featuring in TV and radio programmes such as In Our Time, she regularly writes reviews and articles for publications such as Nature, The Times Literary Supplement, The Lancet and History Today. 

She is currently working on a book about Isaac Newton's final three decades in London, when he became Master of the Mint and President of the Royal Society.

Read More
Read Less
Related Future Lectures
Related Past Lectures
WATCHED
Part of a series

The Secrets of Darwin’s Greenhouse

Professor Jim Endersby
Monday, 8 February 2021 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Mata Hari: Femme Fatales

Professor Joanna Bourke FBA
Thursday, 11 February 2021 - 6:00PM
WATCHED

Giotto and the Early Italian Renaissance

Dr Valerie Shrimplin
Tuesday, 16 February 2021 - 1:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Should We Inherit?

Professor Martin Daunton FBA
Tuesday, 16 February 2021 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Crime in Fiction

Professor John Mullan
Wednesday, 24 February 2021 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Aristotle

Professor Edith Hall
Thursday, 4 March 2021 - 1:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Amelia Dyer: Baby Killers

Professor Joanna Bourke FBA
Thursday, 14 January 2021 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Christmas Lies and Legends

Judith Flanders
Wednesday, 9 December 2020 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Making a Monkey out of Darwin

Professor Jim Endersby
Monday, 30 November 2020 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Plato

Professor Edith Hall
Thursday, 26 November 2020 - 1:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Snow White: Evil Witches

Professor Joanna Bourke FBA
Thursday, 19 November 2020 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Fatal Months: Auschwitz and the End of the Second World War

Professor Nikolaus Wachsmann
Wednesday, 18 November 2020 - 6:00PM
WATCHED

Arise, Sir Isaac! Newton’s London career

Dr Patricia Fara
Wednesday, 26 February 2020 - 7:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Triangular Relationships

Dr Patricia Fara
Thursday, 4 November 2010 - 12:00AM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Sir Thomas Gresham and the Tudor Court

Dr Alexandra Gajda
Thursday, 14 November 2019 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Black Tudors: Three Untold Stories

Dr Miranda Kaufmann
Thursday, 17 October 2019 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Sir Thomas Gresham 1519–2019

Dr John Guy
Thursday, 13 June 2019 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Gresham's Exchange

Professor Stephen Alford
Wednesday, 8 May 2019 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

500 Years of Mathematics: Are We Living in a New Golden Age?

Professor Chris Budd OBE
Tuesday, 30 April 2019 - 1:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

The Natural Environment of Tudor London

Professor Carolyn Roberts
Wednesday, 10 April 2019 - 6:00PM