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Thursday, 24 October 2013, 5:00PM
Barnard's Inn Hall

Creativity in Art, Creativity in Science

Professor Arthur I. Miller

In his lecture, Professor Miller will consider the concept of creativity in the context of his research into the history and philosophy of nineteenth and twentieth century science and technology, cognitive science, scientific creativity, and the relation between art and science.

Key questions to be discussed include the following:

  • Why are some people are more innately talented than others?
  • Can algorithms enable us to better understand the mind of a Bach or a Mondrian?
  • Can computers be genuinely creative?
  • Can discoveries be made while dreaming? 

 

Professor Miller's books include Empire of the Stars and Einstein, Picasso: Space, Time and the Beauty that Causes Havoc, which was nominated for the Pulitzer prize.

professor-arthur-i-miller

Arthur I. Miller is emeritus professor of History and Philosophy of Science at University College London. He has lectured and written extensively on the history and philosophy of 19th- and 20th-century science and technology, cognitive science, scientific creativity, and the relation between art and science. Miller is a fellow and former chairman of the American Physical Society and the recipient of numerous fellowships and grants from organizations including the Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities. The author of several books, his latest work is Empire of the Stars: Friendship, Obsession and Betrayal in the Quest for Black Holes; he is currently working on a book that looks at the complex relationship between the irrational and rational sides of the mind, especially in relation to creativity.

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24 October 2013

Creativity in Art, Creativity in Science
Professor Arthur I. Miller

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