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Thursday, 16 May 2013, 6:00PM
Guildhall Library

The City of London in Literature: Place, People and Pursuits

Professor Ranald Michie

Novelists reflected contemporary attitudes and influenced the way the City was seen both by the wider public at the time and then by later generations.  Could long dead novelists have been far more powerful than long dead economists?  Consider the fact that our view of Victorian society is so influenced by the negative images of Dickens when, at the time, Britain was the richest and most advanced country in the world!

professor-ranald-michie

Department of History, Durham Univeristy.

Professor Michie's research interests all fall into the broad area of financial history. Though primarily focused on the history of the British financial system, his work takes a global perspective. This is driven by a belief that no national financial system can be adequately understood in isolation. While banks and stock exchanges are traditionally studied as distinct financial institutions, he is equally concerned with their interaction through the money and capital markets. He similarly seeks to study both the internal workings and external connections of financial systems. As a result, his research has increasingly concentrated on two aspects. The first is the history of global securities markets, extending his publications on the London Stock Exchange to work on stock exchanges around the world. The second is the history of the City of London as a financial centre as it moved from trade to finance, and from domestic to global orientations.

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16 May 2013

The City of London in Literature: Place, People and Pursuits
Professor Ranald Michie

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