Thursday, 16 June 2011, 6:00PM
Barnard's Inn Hall

Beanstalk or living instrument? How tall can the European Convention on Human Rights grow?

The Rt Hon the Baroness Hale DBE

The pervasive scope of the European Convention of Human Rights has been demonstrated by the furore over the voting rights of prisoners. Is the ECHR a vital cornerstone necessary to protect individual liberties against an encroaching state and the rule of the mob, should it be replaced with a British Bill of Rights or does all Human Rights legislation create more problems than it solves?

This lecture will look at whether the ECHR can continue in its current form and how it might be developed in response to discussion about parliamentary sovereignty and the rule of law.

This is the 2011 Gray's Inn Reading, delivered by the Rt Hon the Baroness Hale of Richmond.

Other Gray's Inn Reading lectures can be accessed here:
    2013 - 2013 Gray's Inn Reading by The Rt Hon The Lord Goldsmith QC
    2012 - Privacy and Publicity in Family Law - Their Eternal Tension by The Rt Hon Sir Nicholas Wall
    2010 - The creation of the supreme court by Lord Hope of Craighead LLD FRSE
    2009 - Sisters-in-Law by The Hon Michael Beloff QC
    2008 - Terrorism: Cold War or Bad Law? by Lord Carlile of Berriew QC
    2007 - Access to Justice: Keeping the doors open by Michael Napier CBE QC
    2006 - The International Dimension of Judicial Review
               by The Rt Hon Sir Stephen Richards
    2005 - Family Law: Rights and social consequences 
               by The Hon Dame Joyanne Bracewell DBE
    2004 - Tackling Cross border crime by Clare Montgomery QC

the-rt-hon-the-baroness-hale-dbe

Brenda Marjorie Hale, Baroness Hale of Richmond, DBE, QC, PC, FBA is a British legal academic, barrister, judge and a Justice of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom.

In 2004, she joined the House of Lords as a Lord of Appeal in Ordinary. She was the only woman ever to have been appointed to this position and served as a Law Lord until 2009 when she, along with the other Law Lords, transferred to the new Supreme Court. She remains the most senior female judge in the history of the United Kingdom.

Baroness Hale was educated at Richmond High School in Yorkshire and went on to study law at Cambridge where she received a starred first. In 1966 she became an academic at the University of Manchester, eventually becoming a professor, and specialising in social welfare law, family law, mental health law and women and the law. She also studied for the Bar, topping the list in the Bar finals in 1968 and practising part-time as a barrister for three years.

In 1984 she became the youngest person and the first woman ever to be appointed to the Law Commission. Over the course of the nine years she spent at the Law Commission she instigated a number of key reforms in family law, health law and criminal law. She initiated and led the Commission’s work which produced the Children Act 1989 - a fundamental and radical re-casting of the relationship between parents, children and the state.

She became a QC in 1989, and was a recorder from 1989-1994 when she was appointed a Judge of the Family Division. In 1999 she was appointed a Lady Justice of Appeal and on 21st October 2003 became the first ever woman Lord of Appeal in Ordinary, or in more common parlance a Law Lord.

In addition to these achievements, she has been a trustee of the Nuffield Foundation, and the driving force behind the development of research on child protection, family law and civil justice. She is also the Chancellor of the University of Bristol, President of the UK Association of Women Judges and currently also of the International Association of Women Judges, President of National Family Mediation and Visitor at Girton College, Cambridge. She has been awarded honorary degrees and the Times Woman Lawyer of the Year Award. She continues to write and has just published the 5th edition of her text book on Mental Health Law.

Brenda Marjorie Hale, Baroness Hale of Richmond, DBE, QC, PC, FBA is a British legal academic, barrister, judge and a Justice of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom.

In 2004, she joined the House of Lords
as a Lord of Appeal in Ordinary. She was the only woman ever to have
been appointed to this position and served as a Law Lord until 2009 when
she, along with the other Law Lords, transferred to the new Supreme
Court. She remains the most senior female judge in the history of the
United Kingdom.

Baroness Hale was educated at
Richmond High School in Yorkshire and went on to study law at Cambridge
where she received a starred first. In 1966 she became an academic at
the University of Manchester,
eventually becoming a professor, and specialising in social welfare
law, family law, mental health law and women and the law. She also
studied for the Bar, topping the list in the Bar finals in 1968 and
practising part-time as a barrister for three years.

In 1984 she became the youngest person and the first woman ever to be appointed to the Law Commission.
Over the course of the nine years she spent at the Law Commission she
instigated a number of key reforms in family law, health law and
criminal law. She initiated and led the Commission’s work which produced
the Children Act 1989 - a fundamental and radical re-casting of the relationship between parents, children and the state.

She
became a QC in 1989, and was a recorder from 1989-1994 when she was
appointed a Judge of the Family Division. In 1999 she was appointed a
Lady Justice of Appeal and on 21st October 2003 became the first ever
woman Lord of Appeal in Ordinary, or in more common parlance a Law Lord.

In addition to these achievements, she has been a trustee of the Nuffield Foundation,
and the driving force behind the development of research on child
protection, family law and civil justice. She is also the Chancellor of
the University of Bristol, President of the UK Association of Women Judges and currently also of the International Association of Women Judges, President of National Family Mediation and Visitor at Girton College, Cambridge.
She has been awarded honorary degrees and the Times Woman Lawyer of the
Year Award. She continues to write and has just published the 5th edition of her text book on Mental Health Law.

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Transcript

16 June 2011

Beanstalk or living instrument? How tall can the European Convention on Human Rights grow?
The Rt Hon the Baroness Hale DBE

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