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Thursday, 15 November 2018, 6:00PM - 7:00PM
Barnard's Inn Hall

Has the Internet Changed News for Better or Worse? 250 Years of Technology

Professor Steve Schifferes


Many claims have been made, both positive and negative, for the transformative nature of internet news in the age of social media. An historical perspective is brought to that debate, by looking at the effects that earlier changes to news production have had for politics, society and commerce. 

It focuses on two major revolutions - the creation of the mass media in the 19th century, and the broadcasting revolution of the 20th century. What can we learn from history about how deeply the internet could transform news in the 21st century? And how does it relate to broader social and economic trends?

Steve Schifferes_370x370.jpg

Steve Schifferes was Majorie Deane Professor of Financial Journalism at City University London from 2009–2017, and is a former BBC economics correspondent. Schifferes was a producer for the BBC’s Money Programme and has also coordinated several big stories for BBC News Online, including the credit crunch, the Enron scandal, and the G20 summit in London.

He has recently been appointed an Honorary Research Fellow at CityPERC, (City political economy research centre)  City, University of London.

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