Tuesday, 22 November 2016, 6:00PM - 7:00PM
Museum of London

Thomas More's Magnificent Utopia

Dr Richard Serjeantson

Thomas More’s Utopia was first published 500 years ago. Its central idea, of a perfect but impossible place, has since become part of our mental furniture. But what does this very amusing (though also rather stern) book mean? It has sometimes been seen as a satire on the inevitable conformity of political equality but may rather offer a portrait of a magnificently just society. Utopia’s links both with London and with the civic culture of Renaissance Europe more generally will be explained. Focussing on its significance at the time when it was written, with reflections on its remarkably varied legacy. This is part of the Being Human festival and is complemented by an exhibition at the University of London's Senate House which runs until December 2016, Utopia and Dystopia


No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture.
2016-11-22_RichardSerjeantson_speaker_370x370.jpg Dr Serjeantson is a Lecturer in History at the University of Cambridge.
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22 November 2016

Thomas More's Magnificent Utopia
Dr Richard Serjeantson

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