Race, Colonialism and Power in the Legal System

Historically, law has been designed to serve the interests of the powerful and privileged. At its worst, the legal system can be a cynical facade for violent repression. But law can also be a vital tool in the hands of the oppressed, and a means of fighting back.

This lecture series will explore the dynamics of race, class and power in the legal systems of the UK and the Commonwealth Caribbean, how those systems have been shaped by the legacy of colonialism, and how the legal system plays a dual role as an instrument of oppression and as a means for the oppressed to defend themselves.

Future Lectures In This Series
WATCHED
Part of a series

The Immigration Act 1971: Celebrated or Flawed?

Professor Leslie Thomas QC
Thursday, 30 September 2021 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Judicial Racism and the Lammy Review

Professor Leslie Thomas QC
Thursday, 2 December 2021 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

The Brixton Riots: Policing the Black Community in the Last 40 Years

Professor Leslie Thomas QC
Thursday, 3 February 2022 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Human Rights in the UK and the Commonwealth Caribbean

Professor Leslie Thomas QC
Thursday, 10 March 2022 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Taking on a Corporate Giant: David v Goliath Legal Cases

Professor Leslie Thomas QC
Thursday, 7 April 2022 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Should the Commonwealth Caribbean Abolish Appeals to the Privy Council?

Professor Leslie Thomas QC
Thursday, 26 May 2022 - 6:00PM