Monday, 22 June 2009, 12:00AM
Barnard's Inn Hall

Metamorphoses – The Terrible Beauty of Change

John Harle, Alderman Professor Michael Mainelli, William Joseph

A Fusion of Benjamin Britten's "Six Metamorphoses After Ovid" (Op.49) with Commercial Musings on Sustainability

Michael Mainelli (speaker)
John Harle (saxophone + speaker)
William Joseph (graphics)

People change the planet in beautiful and terrifying ways, from high art to base waste. Never before have we had such power to transform our planet and ourselves. Never before have we so risked losing everything. Robust economies and environments are essential to mankind's future. This performance combines music inspired by Ovid's works with selections from modern political and economic thinking in order to envision how society might metamorphose towards sustainable commerce with nature.

The Lecture is presented in 6 parts, each one characterised by a mythological being.

Open - Changes

1. Pan - Despair to Hope - Nature to Mankind Pan, who played upon a reed pipe which was Syrinx his beloved. Pan (1:48), graphic - Strings, a fractal

2. Phaethon - Rise and Fall - Mankind's Power Phaethon, who rode upon the chariot of the sun for one day and was hurled into the river Padus by a thunderbolt. Phaethon (1:29), graphic - Sun Spot sequence from hubble telescope

3. Niobe - Pride before Loss - Caution and Trust Niobe, who lamenting the death of her fourteen children, was turned into a mountain. Niobe (2:26), graphic - Volcano, a fractal

4. Bacchus - Destruction after Excess - Internalising Externalities Bacchus, at whose feast is heard the noise of gaggling women's tattling tongues and shouting of boys. Bacchus (1:53), graphic - Feuerwerk, a fractal

5. Narcissus - Inclusive or Exclusive - Feed-forward To Community Narcissus, who fell in love with his own image and became a flower. Narcissus (3:04), graphic - Face2Face, a fractal

6. Arethusa - The Needs of Many - Population Arethusa, who flying from the love of Alpheus the river god, was turned into a fountain. Arethusa (2:49), graphic - Havasu canyon, Arizon

Close - Sustainable Commerce and The Long Finance

This is a part of the series of events which were be held in collaboration with the 2009 City of London Festival.
Other lectures included:
The Idea of the North
London's Lost Rivers
Out of the Wasteland: Hope for a Greener World
Musical Morals and Moral Music: The Artist and the Environment

Burns the European

john-harle

John Harle is one of the most exciting contemporary musicians in Britain. As the leading saxophonist of his generation he has a world profile, both in the wealth of music his playing has inspired and in his own compositions.

His performance of Harrison Birtwistle's Saxophone Concerto Panic at the Last Night of the Proms in 1995 propelled him onto an international stage - followed in 1996 by Terror and Magnificence, his Top Ten hit album on the Decca/Argo label, in collaboration with singer/songwriter Elvis Costello.

His opera, Angel Magick, was commissioned by the BBC Proms in 1998. The librettist, David Pountney directed the production and the composer conducted the cast of eight singers, his own band, and the viol consort Fretwork.

As a concert soloist his repertoire consists of the sixteen concerti written especially for him, as well as twenty-four further works for orchestra. His recital programmes (usually with the pianist/composer Richard Rodney Bennett) are drawn from some of the thirty-one chamber works dedicated to John and an immensely varied range of music from John Dowland through to Chick Corea and his own compositions.

John Harle is the composer of over 25 concert works and 40 film and television scores. The Stanley Myers/John Harle score to Prick Up Your Ears received Best Artistic Achievement in a Feature Film at the Cannes Film Festival 1988. John has since been nominated for many awards including the Mercury Music Prize and the 1996 Royal Television Society Awards' Best Original Music (for Defence of the Realm). The theme music to the BBC drama Silent Witness was awarded a Royal Television Society Award in 1998.

Important collaborations in concert, recording or film have been with Ute Lemper, Paul McCartney, Michael Nyman, Andy Sheppard and Elvis Costello; and with conductors Riccardo Chailly, Michael Tilson-Thomas, Andrew Davis, Neville Marriner, Elgar Howarth and Frans Welser-Möst.

In 1989 John was appointed Professor of Saxophone and Chamber Music at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London and has been the mentor to a new generation of saxophonists.

As performer, composer and producer his discography numbers some thirty-five recordings on labels including Decca, Argo, EMI Classics, Sony, Hyperion, BMG, Virgin and A&M. A CD of his own music Silencium was released on the Argo label in 1997. He recently produced Lesley Garrett's new album for BMG, I will wait for you and composed the music to the 16 part BBC Television series A History of Britain.

Music by John Harle is published by Chester Music

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alderman-professor-michael-mainelli

Alderman Professor Michael Mainelli is Emeritus Mercers' School Memorial Professor of Commerce at Gresham College, having held the chair from 2005 to 2009. His first degree was in Government from Harvard, followed by mathematics and engineering studies at Trinity College Dublin and a PhD from the London School of Economics in chaotic systems, where he was also a Visiting Professor.

Professor Mainelli is Executive Chairman of Z/Yen, the City of London’s leading commercial think-tank and venture firm, which he co-founded in 1994 to promote societal advance through better finance and technology. A qualified accountant (FCCA), securities professional (FCSI), computer specialist (FBCS) and management consultant (FIC), Michael began his career as a research scientist in aerospace (rockets) and computing (architecture & mapping). He later became a senior partner with accountants BDO Binder Hamlyn directing global consulting projects. During the 1990s he worked for the UK Ministry of Defence as Corporate Development Director for Europe’s then largest R&D firm, the Defence Evaluation & Research Agency leading to two privatisations. Career highlights include directing Z/Yen’s Long Finance initiative with Gresham College and the City of London Corporation asking “when would we know our financial system is working?” as well as creating the Global Financial Centres Index, Global Intellectual Property Index, London Accord and Farsight Award. Michael also conceived and produced the first complete digital map of the world in 1983, Mundocart (a 1980’s Google Earth), and the $20 million Geodat consortium cartography project.

Michael is non-executive Director of the United Kingdom Accreditation Service (UK’s national body for standards and laboratories), AIM-listed Sirius Minerals plc (potash mining), AIM-listed Wishbone Gold Plc; Alderman for Broad Street Ward (elected) at the City of London Corporation; Almoner for Christ’s Hospital School; Trustee of International Fund for Animal Welfare. Michael has held numerous advisory posts, for example with Hitachi UK, City University and HM Treasury. Michael won a 1996 UK Foresight Challenge award for the Financial Laboratory, 2003 UK Smart Award for prediction software, 2005 British Computer Society Director of the Year, 2011 Technology Strategy Board Challenge Award for financial avatars, and was awarded Gentiluomo of the Associazione Cavalieri di San Silvestro in 2011. Michael is a Liveryman, Worshipful Company of World Traders, Freeman, Watermen & Lightermen, and represents the Financial Services Group of Livery Companies.

Michael has published over 40 journal articles, 150 commercial articles and four books. Michael’s humorous risk/reward management novel, Clean Business Cuisine: Now and Z/Yen, written with Ian Harris, was a Sunday Times Book of the Week in 2000; Accountancy Age described it as “surprisingly funny considering it is written by a couple of accountants”. Their third co-authored book, The Price of Fish: A New Approach to Wicked Economics and Better Decisions, based on his Gresham lectures, won the 2012 Independent Publisher Book Awards Finance, Investment & Economics Gold Prize. Michael plays bagpipes, loves skiing and sailing and, with his wife, Elisabeth, he races and restores the 1923 Thames Sailing Barge Lady Daphne and sits on the world’s oldest sailing racing body, the Thames Match Committee. With an international family, Michael speaks English, German, French and Italian poorly, but even worse Spanish and Chinese.

To access all of Professor Mainelli's previous Gresham College lectures, please click here.

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william-joseph

After completing studies in philosophy and theology and ordination as a Catholic priest, he rounded off his interests with degree work in physics. For the next twenty years, he taught physics, mathematics, computer science and religion in Catholic schools in Florida. While always continuing to assist parishes or military chaplains, he moved into the computer industry as a software engineer, working in six countries. He continued his interests in theology by doing two sabbaticals at the American College in Leuven, Belgium. Retired, he is now completing a book on the relationship of religion and science subtitled, a case for a theology of evolution.

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Transcript

22 June 2009

Metamorphoses – The Terrible Beauty of Change
John Harle
Alderman Professor Michael Mainelli
William Joseph

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