Device is incompatible to play the video
Monday, 3 October 2011, 1:00PM
Museum of London

The Greenlanders - Arctic whaleships and whalers

Dr Bernard Stonehouse

From 1750 to the early 20th century, fleets of ‘Greenlanders’ – specially strengthened sailing ships –  headed north each spring from Britain to the ice-filled Arctic seas between Canada, Greenland and Spitsbergen. Their business was whaling, their purpose to bring home oil and whalebone – raw materials for Britain’s growing industries. Arctic whaling involved more than 9000 voyages from 35 British ports: Rotherhith's ‘Greenland Dock’ is a reminder that London was a prominent whaling port. Each voyage involved dangers unique to the trade, demanding extraordinary measures of skills and seamanship. Dr Stonehouse tells of the ships, the men, and the profits and losses of a long-forgotten industry.

This is part of the Great Days of Sail  Mondays at One series. The other lectures in this series are as follows:

     ‘They live by Trade’: Britain’s global trade in the Great Days of Sail
     Why Conserve the Cutty Sark?
     Slavery, Ships and Sickness

dr-bernard-stonehouse

Dr. Bernard Stonehouse first visited Antarctica in 1946 as a Royal Navy pilot for the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (later the British Antarctic Survey). He studied penguins and seals on the Antarctic Peninsula, king penguins on South Georgia, and deer, Dall's sheep and other sub-polar species in the Yukon. He taught at universities in Britain, New Zealand and North America and was attached to the Scott Polar Research Institute, Cambridge, where, among other things, he edited the prestigious journal, Polar Record. His books include Animals of the Antarctic and Penguins and Sea Mammals of the World.

Read More
Read Less

Transcript

3 October 2011

The Greenlanders - Arctic whaleships and whalers
Dr Bernard Stonehouse

View PDF
Print
Related Future Lectures
Related Past Lectures
WATCHED

The Mayflower: A London-Leiden Adventure

Graham Taylor
Thursday, 23 April 2020 - 6:00PM
WATCHED

War Games at the Field of the Cloth of Gold

Professor Glenn Richardson
Thursday, 7 May 2020 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

A History of the Foot

Professor Joanna Bourke
Thursday, 14 May 2020 - 6:00PM
WATCHED

The South Sea Bubble of 1720

Dr Helen Paul
Thursday, 21 May 2020 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Hippocrates and Ancient Greek Medicine

Professor Edith Hall
Thursday, 28 May 2020 - 1:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

William And Mary: The Court Divided

Professor Simon Thurley CBE
Wednesday, 10 June 2020 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Good Gardeners of Planet Earth? The Vision of Silent Running (1972)

Jim Endersby
Monday, 23 March 2020 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

A History of the Stomach

Professor Joanna Bourke
Thursday, 19 March 2020 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Charles II: The Court in Exile

Professor Simon Thurley CBE
Wednesday, 18 March 2020 - 6:00PM
WATCHED

Corpse Roads: Digital Landscape Archaeology

Dr Stuart Dunn
Thursday, 12 March 2020 - 6:00PM
WATCHED
Part of a series

Engineering: Archimedes of Syracuse

Professor Edith Hall
Thursday, 5 March 2020 - 1:00PM
WATCHED

Thomas Becket and London

Professor Caroline Barron OBE
Tuesday, 25 February 2020 - 6:00PM
WATCHED

Free the Nipple!

Professor Joanna Bourke
Thursday, 12 March 2020 - 10:00AM
WATCHED

The World's First Scientists

Professor Edith Hall
Thursday, 20 February 2020 - 4:00PM
WATCHED

The World's First University?

Professor Edith Hall
Thursday, 23 May 2019 - 10:00AM
WATCHED

The Greatest Speech Of All Time?

Professor Edith Hall
Friday, 1 March 2019 - 10:00AM
WATCHED

What is Greek Theatre?

Professor Edith Hall
Wednesday, 28 November 2018 - 10:00AM
WATCHED

Was Sappho Really a Women?

Professor Edith Hall
Tuesday, 11 September 2018 - 10:00AM